Friday, August 2, 2013

How To Grow Stevia (a sugar substitute)

Stevia rebaudiana flowers. - Wikipedia -  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevia


You need not be a South American planter to be a successful stevia grower. While the herb’s native locale may make it appear somewhat exotic, it has proved to be quite adaptable and capable of being cultivated in climate zones as diverse as Florida and southern Canada.

True, home-grown stevia may lack the potency of refined white stevia extract; whole stevioside content generally ranges from 81 to 91 percent, as compared to a leaf level of approximately 12 percent. But it can provide you with a quantity of freshly harvested stevia ‘tea leaves’ to augment your supply of commercial stevia sweeteners.

Organic gardeners in particular should find stevia an ideal addition to their yield. Though nontoxic, stevia plants have been found to have insect-repelling tendencies. Their very sweetness, in fact, may be a kind of natural defense mechanism against aphids and other bugs that find it not to their taste. Perhaps that’s why crop-devouring grasshoppers have been reported to bypass stevia under cultivation.

Then, too, raising stevia yourself, whether in your back yard or on your balcony, is another positive way you can personally (and quite legally) protest the wrongheaded government policies that have for so long deprived the American people of its benefits — a kind of contemporary Victory Garden.

This comprehensive web site covers:
  • How to Start Your Own Stevia Patch
  • The Care and Feeding of Stevia
  • Gathering autumn stevia leaves
  • Unlocking the sweetness in your harvest
  • Growing stevia without land
  • Sources for mail-order stevia plants
Read More  http://www.stevia.net/growingstevia.htm

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