Monday, August 5, 2013

5 Surprising Genetically Modified Foods

GE rice may soon be approved for human consumption. Photo illustration/Photos from IRRI, Wikimedia Commons.
Am I eating GMOs?

Probably. Since several common ingredients like corn starch and soy protein are predominantly derived from genetically modified crops, it's pretty hard to avoid GE foods altogether. In fact, GMOs are present in 60 to 70 percent of foods on US supermarket shelves, according to Bill Freese at the Center for Food Safety; the vast majority of processed foods contain GMOs. One major exception is fresh fruits and veggies. The only GM produce you're likely to find is the Hawaiian papaya, a small amount of zucchini and squash, and some sweet corn. No meat, fish and poultry products approved for direct human consumption are bioengineered at this point, however most of the feed for livestock and fish is derived from GE corn, alfalfa, and other biotech grains. Only organic varieties of these animal products are guaranteed GMO-free feed.

So what are some examples of food that are genetically modified?

1. Papayas: In the 1990s, Hawaiian papaya trees were plagued by the ringspot virus which decimated nearly half the crop in the state. In 1998, scientists developed a transgenic fruit called Rainbow papaya which is resistant to the virus. Now 77 percent of the crop grown in Hawaii is genetically engineered (GE).

2. Milk: rGBH, or recombinant bovine growth hormone, is a GE variation on a naturally occurring hormone injected into dairy cows to increase milk production. It is banned for milk destined for human consumption in the European Union, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. Many milk brands that are rGBH-free label their milk as such, but as much as 40 percent of our dairy products including ice cream and cheese contains the hormone.

3. Corn on the Cob: While 90 percent of corn grown in the United States is genetically modified, most of that crop is used for animal feed or ethanol and much of the rest ends up in processed foods. Sweet corn—the stuff that you steam or grill on the barbecue and eat on the cob—was GMO-free until last year when Monsanto rolled out its first GE harvest of sweet corn. While consumers successfully petitioned Whole Foods and Trader Joes to not carry the variety, Walmart has begun stocking the shelves with it without any label. source

Read More   http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2013/08/what-are-gmos-and-why-should-i-care

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Ban Monsanto's Genetically modified Food products in the United States

 https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/ban-monsantos-genetically-modified-food-products-united-states/yrdxqMQT

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