Friday, June 21, 2013

The Other Use of Wild Edible Food

I am a wild food author who lived it for years while homesteading in the Adirondacks of upstate New York, and I lived on wild food for many years after that during my teaching days. I still eat wild food today in retirement.

YES. Wild food is abundant, nutritious, healthy, easy-to-use and, best of all, free! This is important to know, and it's an important cognition to have early on the way to becoming proficient with it. Having your eyes opened to the fact that it is everywhere must, of course, come before starting the journey that ends with being starvation-proofed.

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Wild food represents a lifestyle change —a change of mindset —and it takes some getting used to. It is, first of all, more nutrition than your body is used to dealing with, so over-doing it is easy. It is often a different consistency and a different taste. You will find that you have to adjust the quantity of your intake. There have been lots of instances where the men that I fed wild food to would overdo it and find themselves buzzing with energy from foods like a cattail pollen pancake or too much yarrow tea. This is why the idea of "a pinch to nutrition" is a good one. You will want to start slow and follow my Rules of Foraging as you go, reprinted below for your convenience.

You can dive in and go gung-ho, surely, but this is a journey and can't be traveled all at once, especially on a deadline of personal starvation. You need to start now, before you need it. The essential unit of learning this skill is learning one plant thoroughly and completely. THIS represents one step, and that step is repeated for each and every plant until you finally have a full collection of them. You quite probably do not have even one plant learned completely all the way from ID to storage. If so, you have not really started your journey into wild food proficiency!

http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/06/the-other-use-of-wild-edible-food-by-linda-runyon.html

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